What scuppers your development?

Effective learning programmes focus as much on removing the barriers to applying new skills and behaviours as they do on learning them in the first place. In fact, I would go as far as to say when it comes to leadership and management, you often don’t need “up-skilling,” you just need support to apply what you already know you “should” be doing if life didn’t keep getting in the way.

You know you should get out of the detail and be thinking bigger picture, you know you should be challenging your processes and your thinking to ensure they still make sense in your rapidly changing environment, you know you should be coaching and mentoring your people so they stay engaged and committed to your business objectives.  Why don’t you?

Think of a time when you attended a development programme and returned to work full of good intentions to apply your learning, only to slip back into the same old habits, behaviours and thinking that you used before.

What was it that got in the way? Was it something within you? Your limiting beliefs, level of confidence or level of commitment? Was it something in those around you? An unsupportive boss perhaps or no opportunity to share your learning with others? Was it something in the organisational set up that hindered you in behaving differently and trying new things?

I design programmes for individuals and groups that maximise the transfer and application of learning by overcoming the barriers that get in the way. That way you get to apply your skills consistently and effectively and your business gets maximum return on investment.

What do you, others, or your organisation do that scuppers you in applying new learning?

How can you be supported to apply and sustain as much new learning as possible?

Julie Kay helps you improve individual and team performance by building the strong trusting relationships you rely on for your success. If you are genuinely interested in boosting performance, productivity and profits the answer is just a click away. For more information, just click here

Engaging in change

I have recently made a big decision to relocate with my two sons from a rural hamlet in the Yorkshire Dales to the city of York. Having lived in 32 different places during my life you may think this is no big deal but because of our family history and the emotional investment in this place, it feels like it is. I have felt for some time that as the boys get older they need to experience the things that living in a livelier place will bring.

Initially quite ambivalent about the move we have suddenly all bought into the idea and are getting excited about the prospect, even though we don’t know where we will be living, what school Ben will go to, what Jack will do with his life etc. I started thinking about how this fits with what I know about getting people to buy in to change both personally and professionally and how we have made this shift as a family.

Me – I began by finding out about opportunities for the boys that I knew would appeal to them, after all, I believed that was my main motivation for moving.  It helped me to start painting a vision of what it would be like living there and the benefits it would bring each of them. I talked to people who knew York and they all seemed to love it. I began considering all the things I could access, such as classes, groups and cultural events that are difficult to attend where I live. Finally I spent last weekend there on my own, soaking up the atmosphere, and getting a feel for the place. That convinced me what a great opportunity this was for me as well as for the boys.

Jack (16) didn’t want to move at first because he would lose his friends. The reality is, in order to get a job, or go to college his friends like most people here are likely to move away and not come back, as there are so few opportunities for employment or housing..  What sold the move to Jack was that a) he can make friends there and they are likely to stay around. b) the night life is good  and c) when he is ready he will be able to live independently from us whilst still having us there when needed.

Ben (12) loves living rurally and feels he is the one with the most to lose. Though understandably nervous, he is now excited about moving to a bigger school and the additional facilities and sports clubs this brings. Another major plus factor for Ben, unlike Jack, is that he has realised he can attend university or college or find a job all whilst still living at home with me for as long as he likes. (At the moment he estimates that to be around the next 30 years :-))

So three people with different perceived losses, different concerns, different priorities and different benefits all making the journey through change and becoming engaged in the process. How do you help others through change?

Julie Kay helps you improve individual and team performance by building the strong trusting relationships you rely on for your success. If you are genuinely interested in boosting performance, productivity and profits the answer is just a click away. For more information, just click here

Overcoming Blocks to Action

In his book The Now Habit, Neil Fiore outlines the six step process below for facing fears and creating safety. His book also contains a very good explanation of the link between perfectionism and procrastination. For these two sections alone I highly recommend his book.

Meanwhile, when you find yourself worrying about failing on a project or losing a job, ask yourself:

1. What is the worst that could happen?

Choose the most dreaded scenario and how likely it is to happen. What would you do if it did?

2. What would I do if the worst really happened?

Where would you get help? What would you do to cope with getting upset and losing control? Then what? After that? And then what? Question yourself until you know there is no event so bad that it can stop you.

3. How would I lessen the pain and get on with as much happiness as possible if the worse did occur?

If the worst happens, focus on shortening the depression and self-criticism by forgiving yourself for being human, vulnerable and imperfect? How would you get back on track with improving your life regardless of how bad things get? What strengths have got you through in the past? What can you learn from your past achievements about coping with adversity?

4. What alternatives would I have?

Consider if you have limited your options by being too rigid. How can you increase your alternatives? There are many ways to be happy and successful.

5. What can I do now to lessen the probability of this dreaded event occurring?

What have you been putting off that once you face, will lessen the worry, make you feel safe and get you into action? Once you have considered the worst that could happen and prepared yourself to cope with that, you are ready to tackle the tasks that are likely to increase your chance of success.

6. Is there anything I can do now to increase my chances of achieving my goal?

Now you have considered the worst case scenario, made plans for how to deal with it if it happens, and discovered you have alternatives, you can ask yourself, “Is there anything I can do now to increase my chances of achieving my goal?”

According to Neil Fiore, true confidence comes from knowing that, having prepared for the worst you can focus on the work that will lead to the best.

How do you overcome blocks to action?

Julie Kay helps you improve individual and team performance by building the strong trusting relationships you rely on for your success. If you are genuinely interested in boosting performance, productivity and profits the answer is just a click away. For more information, just click here

5 ways to make a decision

Have you ever suspected that you are being asked for your opinion on something when the decision has already been made?

Have you ever asked your team to make a decision and when they do, you realise you can’t possibly support it?

What about when the loudest, most senior or most aggressive person in the room always seems to swing the decision their way?

Sometimes the decision making process works well, is transparent and understood by those involved and leads not only to better decisions but also generates trust. More frequently the opposite is true.

Knowing the 5 basic types of decision will help you consciously chose the right process and communicates your reasons for that choice, depending on elements such as timescales, levels of authority, and where the relevant information is held.

Autocratic – You have all the information you need so you make the decision by yourself.

Consultative – You involve others by asking for their suggestions, ideas and recommendations and then you decide.

Consensus – You involve others by generating and evaluating ideas and alternatives and reach a decision by consensus.

Delegated – You determine that another person or group holds the information and the ability to make the decision so you delegate it to them and support the decision they make.

Democratic – You are part of a group that in which decisions are made by a majority vote.

Bearing in mind there is no right way; each type of decision is effective in different circumstances:

  • How do you decide the best approach for different situations?
  • What is your experience of decision making in your organisation?
Julie Kay helps you improve individual and team performance by building the strong trusting relationships you rely on for your success. If you are genuinely interested in boosting performance, productivity and profits the answer is just a click away. For more information, just click here

7 Questions to Kick Start 2012

How many times over the last few days have you been asked if you are going to make a New Year’s Resolution? I’m not going to, because it doesn’t happen to fit with my usual and continuous 3 month to 3 year planning process, but I would love to hear how you are intending to get the most from 2012. Perhaps a couple of coaching questions will help you get started in formulating your thoughts and committing to yourself and your own development a little more seriously than most people do to their New Year’s Resolutions.

If you agree, let’s dive straight in:

  1. What one thing would make the biggest improvement in your life over the next 12 months?
  2. If you could have what you want, in just the way you want it, what would that do for you?
  3. In what way would you like this year to be different from last year?
  4. If you could really have what you secretly wanted, what would that be?
  5. What are your biggest fears and how can you overcome them?
  6. What new habits do you want to acquire this year and which do you want to shed?
  7. Which relationships do you want to develop this year and which do you need to let go of?

What are your goals and challenges are for 2012?

Julie Kay helps you improve individual and team performance by building the strong trusting relationships you rely on for your success. If you are genuinely interested in boosting performance, productivity and profits the answer is just a click away. For more information, just click here
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