7 Simple Steps to Getting Heard in Meetings

The Apprentice in the UK has come to an end for another year. While I don’t take the programme too seriously in relation to real business, I am fascinated to observe the dynamics between the candidates and between the candidates and Lord Sugar and his panel. Having heard how Susan felt undermined due to her age, and seen Tom’s strategy of politely raising his hand in an effort to be heard, I have been giving more thought to how to get heard in meetings.

  • Are you ever in meetings where everyone is talking over you?
  • Do you feel frustrated that you aren’t getting credit for your ideas and suggestions?
  • Do you hang back like someone waiting to jump in at skipping?

Here are my quick tips for becoming a key contributor whose input is seen as invaluable:

  1. Listen – This probably isn’t what you want to hear (see what I did there? :-)) This doesn’t mean staying silent and passive. It means listening effectively so you can find ways to link your point to others. Rather than focussing on what you want to say, just make a few bullet points as notes and then turn your attention to listening to others. When you acknowledge and build on what others have contributed they are more likely to return the favour.
  2. Try holding up your hand – I know Tom from the Apprentice tried this with apparently little affect. This could have been because he did it in an eager school boy way. It doesn’t do to be reaching as high as possible, whilst still sitting on your seat and saying “me, me, me!” Okay a slight exaggeration. Try holding up your hand more like a stop signal and saying “I would like to say something”
  3. Interrupt – If the person doing the talking is long winded and moving off topic, everyone will be very grateful if you interrupt and say something like “can I stop you there and just summarise where we are up to?” Or “Can I make sure we are all clear about the point you’re making.”
  4. If they interrupt – and you aren’t the person being long winded and moving off topic, say firmly “Please let me finish.”
  5. Speak with clarity and confidence. – You will come across as having more gravitas and credibility if you slow down, think before you speak and ensure you don’t sound tentative. Others tend to dismiss people who appear to lack confidence.
  6. Ditch the language that undermines your message – If I had a pound for every time I hear someone, usually women, start their point with “This might sound silly but….” Or “This might be just me but…” Aargh! You might as well just say, don’t bother listening to what I’m about to tell you because even I don’t value it.
  7. Learn from experience – Think about the times when your communication has had the desired effect, when you have been listened to, when you have commanded attention and been acknowledged for your input. What did you do? What did you say? What was happening around you? What helped? Now just rinse and repeat! 🙂

Let me know how you get on and if there’s anything I can help you with.

6 Responses to 7 Simple Steps to Getting Heard in Meetings

  • Hola gracias por compartir tu informacion pero no entendi ni una papa de todas formas agradecida

  • Thanks. Precise and concise . Some points I am doing and others I need to learn and start doing

  • Good suggestions. Even the timid can learn to use those points in a meeting — to good effect! Most importantly, don’t underrate your contribution. The others need to hear it, so make it clear for them.

  • Good stuff. I think it also needs to be recognised that people also need to re-evaluate their reluctance to speak up. I don’t me they need to go on the couch or anything, just simply take a little time out to ponder why? What is it that is holding them back? Does it still stand up to scrutiny as a good approach. I’ve seen some remarkable changes that endure from 10 minutes talking about why.

    • I agree Colin. If we step off auto pilot for a moment and consider what’s getting in the way it’s a great step forward and sometimes all that’s needed to create forward momentum.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *